HYLINE SAFETY COMPANY operates as NYC's leading supplier and installer of Local Law 26 Photoluminescent markings. Since 2003 HYLINE has completed over 300+ Installations and continues to serve NYC high-rise building occupants with the improved safety of glow-in-the-dark egress guidance systems.

Please call us for a no cost building survey and NYC Compliant Photoluminescent Materials and Installation quotation. Tel. #212-688-5600 / Fax #212-688-6683 / EMail: Info@HylineSafety.com

SAFETY SIGNS, SAFETY IODENTIFICATION, OSHA, LOCK OUT, TAG OUT, PHOTOLUMINESCENT, LOCAL LAW 26, GLOW
CLICK HERE TO ORDER SAFETY IDENTIFICATION PRODUCTS. HYLINE SAFETY COMPANY IS NEW YORK CITY'S LEADING PROVIDER OF SAFETY SIGNS. WE WILL SHIP YOUR ORDER WITHIN 24 HOURS OF RECEIVING IT.

NYC has adopted the ICC Buildings Code.

SECTION 1024: LUMINOUS EGRESS PATH MARKINGS

1024.1 General. Approved luminous egress path markings delineating the exit path shall be provided in buildings of Groups A, B, E, I, M and R-1 having occupied floors located more than 75 feet (22 860 mm) above the lowest level of fire department vehicle access in accordance with Sections 1024.1 through 1024.5.

Exceptions:

1. Luminous egress path markings shall not be required on the level of exit discharge in lobbies that serve as part of the exit path in accordance with Section 1027.1, Exception 1.

2. Luminous egress path markings shall not be required in areas of open parking garages that serve as part of the exit path in accordance with Section 1027.1, Exception 3.

1024.2 Markings within exit enclosures. Egress path markings shall be provided in exit enclosures, including vertical exit enclosures and exit passageways, in accordance with Sections 1024.2.1 through 1024.2.6.

1024.2.1 Steps. A solid and continuous stripe shall be applied to the horizontal leading edge of each step and shall extend for the full length of the step. Outlining stripes shall have a minimum horizontal width of 1 inch (25 mm) and a maximum width of 2 inches (51 mm). The leading edge of the stripe shall be placed at a maximum of 1/2 inch (13 mm) from the leading edge of the step and the stripe shall overlap the leading edge of the step by not more than 1/2 inch (13 mm) down the vertical face of the step.

Exception: The minimum width of 1 inch (25 mm) shall not apply to outlining stripes listed in accordance with UL1994.

1024.2.2 Landings. The leading edge of landings shall be marked with a stripe consistent with the dimensional requirements for steps.

1024.2.3 Handrails. All handrails and handrail extensions shall be marked with a solid and continuous stripe having a minimum width of 1 inch (25 mm). The stripe shall be placed on the top surface of the handrail for the entire length of thehandrail, including extensions and newel post caps. Where handrails or handrail extensions bend or turn corners, the stripe shall not have a gap of more than 4 inches (102 mm).

Exception: The minimum width of 1 inch (25 mm) shall not apply to outlining stripes listed in accordance with UL1994.

1024.2.4 Perimeter demarcation lines. Stair landings and other floor areas within exit enclosures, with the exception of the sides of steps, shall be provided with solid and continuous demarcation lines on the floor or on the walls or a combination of both. The stripes shall be 1 to 2 inches (25mm to 51 mm) wide with interruptions not exceeding 4 inches (102 mm).

Exception: The minimum width of 1 inch (25 mm) shall not apply to outlining stripes listed in accordance with UL1994.

1024.2.4.1 Floor-mounted demarcation lines. Perimeter demarcation lines shall be placed within 4 inches (102 mm) of the wall and shall extend to within 2 inches (51 mm) of the markings on the leading edge of landings. The demarcation lines shall continue across the floor in front of all doors.

Exception: Demarcation lines shall not extend in front of exit doors that lead out of an exit enclosure and through which occupants must travel to complete the exit path.

1024.2.4.2 Wall-mounted demarcation lines. Perimeter demarcation lines shall be placed on the wall with the bottom edge of the stripe no more than 4 inches (102 mm) above the finished floor. At the top or bottom of the stairs, demarcation lines shall drop vertically to the floor within 2 inches (51 mm) of the step or landing edge. Demarcation lines on walls shall transition vertically to the floor and then extend across the floor where a line on the floor is the only practical method of outlining the path. Where the wall line is broken by a door, demarcation lines on walls shall continue across the face of the door or transition to the floor and extend across the floor in front of such door.

Exception: Demarcation lines shall not extend in front of exit doors that lead out of an exit enclosure and through which occupants must travel to complete the exit path.

1024.2.4.3 Transition. Where a wall-mounted demarcation line transitions to a floor-mounted demarcation line, or vice versa, the wall-mounted demarcation line shall drop vertically to the floor to meet a complementary extension of the floor-mounted demarcation line, thus forming a continuous marking.

1024.2.5 Obstacles. Obstacles at or below 6 feet 6 inches (1981 mm) in height and projecting more than 4 inches (102 mm) into the egress path shall be outlined with markings no less than 1 inch (25 mm) in width comprised of a pattern of alternating equal bands, of luminescent luminous material and black, with the alternating bands no more than 2 inches (51 mm) thick and angled at 45 degrees (0.79 rad). Obstacles shall include, but are not limited to, standpipes, hose cabinets, wall projections and restricted height areas. However, such markings shall not conceal any required information or indicators including, but not limited to, instructions to occupants for the use of standpipes.

1024.2.6 Doors from exit enclosures. Doors through which occupants within an exit enclosure must pass in order to complete the exit path shall be provided with markings complying with Sections 1024.2.6.1 through 1024.2.6.3.

1024.2.6.1 Emergency exit symbol. The doors shall be identified by a low-location luminous emergency exit symbol complying with NFPA 170. The exit symbol shall be a minimum of 4 inches (102 mm) in height and shall be mounted on the door, centered horizontally, with the top of the symbol no higher than 18 inches (457 mm) above the finished floor.

1024.2.6.2 Door hardware markings. Door hardware shall be marked with no less than 16 square inches (406 mm2) of luminous material. This marking shall be located behind, immediately adjacent to or on the door handle and/or escutcheon. Where a panic bar is installed, such material shall be no less than 1 inch (25 mm) wide for the entire length of the actuating bar or touchpad.

1024.2.6.3 Door frame markings. The top and sides of the door frame shall be marked with a solid and continuous 1 inch to 2 inch (25 mm to 51 mm) wide stripe. Where the door molding does not provide sufficient flat surface on which to locate the stripe, the stripe shall be permitted to be located on the wall surrounding the frame.

1024.3 Uniformity. Placement and dimensions of markings shall be consistent and uniform throughout the same exit enclosure.

1024.4 Self-luminous and photoluminescent. Luminous egress path markings shall be permitted to be made of any material, including paint, provided that an electrical charge is not required to maintain the required luminance. Such materials shall include, but are not limited to, self-luminous materials and photoluminescent materials. Materials shall comply with either:

1. UL 1994; or

2. ASTM E 2072, except that the charging source shall be 1 foot-candle (11 lux) of fluorescent illumination for 60 minutes, and the minimum luminance shall be 30 millicandelas per square meter at 10 minutes and 5 millicandelas per square meter after 90 minutes.

1024.5 Illumination. Exit enclosures where photoluminescent exit path markings are installed shall be provided with the minimum means of egress illumination required by Section 1006 for at least 60 minutes prior to periods when the building is occupied. 


Did your building submit the required Exit Sign Power Source  report to the Department of Buildings on or before July 1, 2007? Have you received a notice of violation? HYLINE SAFETY can create and file your buildings required EXIT SIGN Power Source report.

LOCAL LAW 26/04 REQUIRES A REPORT REGARDING POWER SOURCE TO EXIT SIGNS FOR HIGHRISE BUILDINGS  IN NYC CONSTRUCTED PRIOR TO THE EFECTIVE DATE OF LOCAL LAW 16/84


Applicability:
Office Buildings

Educational Buildings

Hotel Buildings

High-rise >75 ft Mercantile

High-rise >75 ft Industrial

High-rise > 75ft Institutional


Local Law 26/04 amends section 27-384 (Power Source) of the Building Code of the City of New York

effective October 22, 2004. For the applicable buildings (see above), all illuminated exit signs must be

provided with an emergency power source or storage battery equipment meeting the requirements of the

commissioner, whether or not these exit signs are on circuits that are separate from the general lighting

and power circuits taken off ahead of the main switch. If your building is already in compliance, i.e., if exit signs are connected to an emergency power source or to storage battery equipment, the owner should submit an affidavit to the Department by January 20, 2005 certifying that your building is in full compliance. Failure to submit this certification by January 20, 2005 will place you in the below-described category, requiring a certified report by a registered architect or engineer. If you cannot certify that the signs are properly connected by January 20, 2005, you must then make the proper connections and file a report with the Department of Buildings indicating that all required exit and/or directional signs are properly connected. A registered architect or engineer must certify completion of the work not later than July 1, 2007. For copies of the affidavit to be submitted by January 20, 2005 as well as further information regarding other requirements of Local Law 26/04, please refer to the Department of Buildings’ website, www.nyc.gov/buildings.


LOCAL LAW 26/04 REPORT OF COMPLIANCE POWER SOURCE FOR EXIT SIGNS
Effective October 22, 2004, Local Law 26 of 2004 (“LL 26/04”) amends Section 27-228.5(a) of the Administrative Code to require building owners to submit a report from a registered architect or professional engineer certifying that all exit and/or directional signs required to comply with Section 27-384(c) are connected to an emergency power source and/or storage battery equipment. This report must be filed for existing buildings constructed prior to the enactment of Local Law 16/84 in each of the following classifications:

• High Rise buildings (≥75 ft.) classified in groups C (mercantile), D (industrial), or H (institutional)

All buildings classified in groups E (business), G (educational), or J-1 (hotel)

View NYC approvged EXIT signs


Document
LL26 POWER SOURCE FOR EXIT SIGNS REPORT
Be prepared for Power Failure, Fire and Smoke Conditions- Glow in the dark signs save lives.









HYLINE SAFETY COMPANY
421 Seventh Avenue, Suite 500
New York, NY 10001 USA
Tel. #212-688-5600 / Fax #212-688-6683
E-Mail: Info@HYLINESAFETY.COM


HYLINE SAFETY COMPANY working in cooperation with the Real Estate Board of New York offers a REBNY Members Benefit  Pricing Discount Program for Photoluminescent Signs and Markings Materials and Installation services. Please contact REBNY for details.
Document
NYC’s amended Local Law 26 makes “Glow in the Dark” signs for Class E Commercial High Rise Buildings MANDATORY
TO ORDER SAFETY IDENTIFICATION PRODUCTS ONLINE   -CLICK HERE
Thinking about your personal safety? Plan ahead just in case.

Does your building or business have a Safety Evacuation Plan? Planning for emergencies saves lives. Preparation is usually very simple but must be done and effectively communicated to others in your workplace / living place. It is very important to train for emergencies so that each person knows the correct procedures for a safe evacuation if needed.

BUILDING SAFETY INFORMATION

EVACUTION INSTRUCTIONS

Your immediate response should be:

•Stop work- Remain Calm
•Shut Down all equipment
•Leave your office area - Close your door

EXIT THE BUILDING

•Walk quickly to the nearest exit
•Alert other employees
•Escort visitors from the building
•Do not panic - Do not run

ASSEMBLY AREA

•Assemble in your designated area
•Advise supervisor if anyone is missing
•Do not return to work area untill all clear signal is given by proper authority

EMERGENCY EXIT ROUTES

•Post Floor Plans on Safety Information Board
•Indicate Your Location on the Exit Map
•Mark Main Exit Route
•Mark Fire Extinguisher and Fire Alarm Locations
•Review Emergency Procedures with Employees at Regular Safety Meetings

FIRE EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS

Your immediate response should be:

•Remain calm
•Evaluate fire condition
•Extinguish the fire if possible

BUILDING EVACUATION

•Sound the fire alarm
•Follow evacuation procedures
•Escort visitors from building
•Never use elevators to exit the building (unless instructed by firefighter officials)

NOTIFY FIRE DEPT.

•Notify fire dept. of all hazards or evacuation concerns
•Notify fire dept. of all fire extinguishers used or missing
•Notify fire dept. of all blocked exits or obstructed aisle ways.

FOUR ELEMENTS OF SAFETY SIGNS AND LABELS

"A product safety sign or label should alert persons to a specific hazard seriousness, the probable consequence of involvement with the hazard and how the hazard can be avoided."- ANSI Z535.4-1998.

Even when appropriate design features and safety devices are incorporated into machinery, some risks may remain. Safety labels alert operators or other exposed workers to these risks, instruct them of the consequences of interaction with the hazard, and convey the severity of the hazard.

Though other standards exist, for products sold in the U.S., ANSI Z535 is the standard that applies. First published in 1981, it was revised in 1998 and again in 2002. For international standards, ISO 3864 can be applied to both Public Area and Facility Signs or Product Safety Labels.

Although ANSI Z535 is a voluntary standard, a legal duty to warn operators and end users of hazards is based on meeting or exceeding this standard. When choosing a safety sign or label, there are four elements to look for. They include the following:
-Signal Word;
-Specific Hazard;
-Probable consequence of involvement with the hazard; and
-How the hazard can be avoided.

The Signal Word communicates the degree or level of hazard seriousness. The other three components: the specific hazard, the probable consequence of involvement with the hazard, and how the hazard can be avoided are communicated through the word message and the optional use of a pictorial.

Signal Word
The ANSI Z535.4 standard (section 4) contains the following Signal word definitions:

DANGER indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury. This signal word is to be limited to the most extreme situations.

WARNING indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.

CAUTION indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury. It may also be used to alert against unsafe practices.

In choosing a signal word there are two questions to ask:
1. If the safety label's message is ignored, how severe will the injury be?
2. If the safety label's message is ignored, how likely is it that an injury will occur?

If the answer to the first question, "death or serious injury" is YES: The choice is between DANGER and WARNING.

If the message is ignored, how likely is it that an injury will occur? If it is highly likely (a will likely happen situation) the correct signal word is DANGER.

f it is a possibility (a could happen situation) the correct signal word is WARNING.

If the answer to the first question "death or serious injury" is NO: the correct signal word is CAUTION. The signal word's color background, in accordance ANSI Z53.1 9 (Safety Color Code), in combination with the signal word, communicates the seriousness level of the hazard.

The other three components: the specific hazard, the probable consequence of involvement with the hazard, and how the hazard can be avoided are communicated through the word message and the optional us of a pictorial.

The use of a pictorial is recommended. A pictorial is able to communicate a message across language barriers. It is also a quick, attention getting form of communication.

There are two distinct formats for the pictorial, a standard graphic or a graphic formatted to the ISO 3864 standard.

Note: This article is appeared in the June 2004 issue of Facility Safety Management.